Swinburne and His Gods: The Roots and Growth of an Agnostic Poetry

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University of Toronto Quarterly

This award celebrates Margot's excellence in and passion for research. Margot graduated from Smith College in Massachusetts summa cum laude and with highest honours in English.

Margot began teaching at the University of Victoria in , where she was an active and highly respected member of the academic community. A foremost specialist in the literature of the Victorian period, she contributed significantly to the resurgence of respect for the work of A. In addition to many articles and reviews in literary journals, her publications include the books Swinburne and his Gods: The Roots and Growth of an Agnostic Poetry and Persephone Rises: Mythography, Gender and the Creation of a New Spirituality, forthcoming in She also co-edited a collection of scholarly essays: Influence and Resistance in Nineteenth Century Poetry Allen refers to Swinburne's "The Sundew," originally publish.


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Spectator on July 26, , but revised four years later for Poem lads, and Charles Darwin's Insectivorous Plants As the pass alludes to the Fall, echoing God's curse upon the Serpent in Genesis 3. Allen refers to Swinburne s The Sundew, originally publish.

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Spectator on July 26, , but revised four years later for Poem lads, and Charles Darwin s Insectivorous Plants As the pass alludes to the Fall, echoing God s curse upon the Serpent in Genesis 3. Algernon Charles Swinburne Analysis - eNotes.


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  • Algernon Swinburne;
  • Symposium on the Role of Women in the Church.
  • His health suffered as a result, and in at the age of 42 he had a mental and physical breakdown and was taken into care by his friend Theodore Watts, who looked after him for the rest of his life at No. Thereafter he lost his youthful rebelliousness and developed into a figure of social respectability.

    Algernon Charles Swinburne: Bibliography

    He died on the 10th April at the age of 72 and was buried at Bonchurch on the Isle of Wight. Housman, a more measured and even somewhat hostile critic, devoted paragraphs of praise to his rhyming ability.

    Crowley on Swinburne

    Painting by William Bell ScottSwinburne's work was once quite popular among undergraduates at Oxford and Cambridge, though today it has largely gone out of fashion. This largely mirrors the popular and academic consensus regarding his work as well, although his Poems and Ballads, First Series and his Atalanta in Calydon have never been out of critical favor. It was Swinburne's misfortune that the two works, published when he was nearly 30, soon established him as England's premier poet, the successor to Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Robert Browning.

    This was a position he held in the popular mind until his death, but sophisticated critics like A. Housman felt, rightly or wrongly, that the job of being one of England's very greatest poets was beyond him.

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    Swinburne may have felt this way himself. He was a highly intelligent man and in later life a much-respected critic, and he himself believed that the older a man was, the more cynical and less trustworthy he became. This of course created problems for him as he aged.

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